Not 100% accurate. Guy didn’t plan to kill Crimson’s son beforehand, aka, he didn’t move int duke Fabre’s household just to kill Luke. He was rescued by Pere and brought to Kimlasca where Pere decided to take care of him while working for duke Fabre. It was only after after finding out where he was going to and finding out that Pere and Fabre had arranged for him to babysit Luke (then Asch) that he decided to plan Luke’s death.
But alas, Guy got attached to him and was unable to do so and eventually he gave up on revenge, even if, at times, looking at Crimson or Luke/Asch would bring back painful memories.
However, that doesn’t diminish Guy being “perfect” any less because 1) this was never actually shown in the game and could only be found by hearing (implicitly) about Guy’s past in sidequests, thus making it completely missable and 2) Guy was so damn soft he gave up on the plan and befriended his “enemy” instead, thus ruling out the possibility that he can’t be perfect.
Guy’s character is overall pretty much flawless and well constructed, but also at times bland and predictable because of how immaculate he is.

Not 100% accurate. Guy didn’t plan to kill Crimson’s son beforehand, aka, he didn’t move int duke Fabre’s household just to kill Luke. He was rescued by Pere and brought to Kimlasca where Pere decided to take care of him while working for duke Fabre. It was only after after finding out where he was going to and finding out that Pere and Fabre had arranged for him to babysit Luke (then Asch) that he decided to plan Luke’s death.

But alas, Guy got attached to him and was unable to do so and eventually he gave up on revenge, even if, at times, looking at Crimson or Luke/Asch would bring back painful memories.

However, that doesn’t diminish Guy being “perfect” any less because 1) this was never actually shown in the game and could only be found by hearing (implicitly) about Guy’s past in sidequests, thus making it completely missable and 2) Guy was so damn soft he gave up on the plan and befriended his “enemy” instead, thus ruling out the possibility that he can’t be perfect.

Guy’s character is overall pretty much flawless and well constructed, but also at times bland and predictable because of how immaculate he is.

purplescorpion123:

Tales of the Abs
I’m [not] sorry.

purplescorpion123:

Tales of the Abs

I’m [not] sorry.

laurateridesu:

Tales of the Abyss/Text Post Meme - 2/??

towerofpride:

01-03 Luke Expressions 1

01-03 Luke Expression Shading Reference

01-04 Luke Expressions 2

01-05 Luke Expressions 3

margadraws:

after doing the hairstyle meme I just had to draw him in that ponytail omg

margadraws:

after doing the hairstyle meme I just had to draw him in that ponytail omg

reversebladesword:

i havent drawn luke in awhile so i did

reversebladesword:

i havent drawn luke in awhile so i did

fawfulthegreat:

Well, with fonons it’s actually explained as sound waves that comprise matter. It still exists as a way to justify the magic that the plot hinges on, but it’s more fleshed out than most other examples the series uses.
I still don’t know what the freakin’ hell eleth does other than it’s important for some reason but that reason is never consistent.

The thing about fonons is that they’re, quite simply, just that. They’re particles that emit specific soundwaves and everything and everyone in the world is made of them. But they don’t exactly power anything. Rather, humans are the ones that came up with using them as a resource to make the Planet Storm and it’s that reaction that allows them to use magic. (If I’m not mistaken, Vesperia is similar to this, though I can’t remember since I played it ages ago). It’s not really there to explain magic since, in actuality, it’s the other way around in which magic justifies fonons, and the Planet Storm is involved in a much more complex point story later on
In Graces Eleth is your standard mana-like substance that fuels each planet and is used to justify things like Lambda.

fawfulthegreat:

Well, with fonons it’s actually explained as sound waves that comprise matter. It still exists as a way to justify the magic that the plot hinges on, but it’s more fleshed out than most other examples the series uses.

I still don’t know what the freakin’ hell eleth does other than it’s important for some reason but that reason is never consistent.

The thing about fonons is that they’re, quite simply, just that. They’re particles that emit specific soundwaves and everything and everyone in the world is made of them. But they don’t exactly power anything. Rather, humans are the ones that came up with using them as a resource to make the Planet Storm and it’s that reaction that allows them to use magic. (If I’m not mistaken, Vesperia is similar to this, though I can’t remember since I played it ages ago). It’s not really there to explain magic since, in actuality, it’s the other way around in which magic justifies fonons, and the Planet Storm is involved in a much more complex point story later on

In Graces Eleth is your standard mana-like substance that fuels each planet and is used to justify things like Lambda.

dimensionslip:

More new swimsuit cards in Tales of Kizna!

applepai:

WHEW. Finally got this done! TotA is one of my favorites, and I thought it deserved a fitting tribute; I really pushed myself with this one, and I’m actually incredibly satisfied with it.

Tales of Text Posts inspired by all those other text post posts